Solstand Shawl

salstand shawl front

I picked up some Lion Brand Mandala yarn and immediately knew I wanted to make a shawl with it. The question was: which shawl? I searched for a while, but was unable to find any pattern that fit my specific vision, so I decided to design and make my own.

solstand shawl first draft pattern and shawl

Over the course of about ten days, I turned my 2 skeins of Lion Brand Mandala in Spirit into a shawl and wrote up a pattern for it! This shawl pattern requires knowledge of basic stitches, as well as front post and back post stitches. The shawl uses about 1000-1200 yards of DK yarn and a size 5 mm (H) crochet hook Instructions for bobble and puff stitches are included. Scroll down to the bottom of this page for a link to purchase the pattern!

dog on solstand shawl
Jupiter would prefer if I didn’t put my crochet on his ottoman

For the most part I was super happy with the yarn I used. It didn’t become ‘fuzzy’ even after ripping out and crocheting repeatedly, and the colors were beautiful. Each skein had 1 complete repeat of the colors so they were easy to cut apart and match up when changing over.

color change solstand shawl

My only complaint is that inside the second skein, there was a tiny knot tying two completely different shades of blue together. I’m used to yarn having a small knot in it, but I am not pleased with the color change. I ended up cutting it apart and was able to match up the colors, but it’s not ideal.

solstand shawl back open

However, I’d still recommend using Lion Brand Mandala for this shawl. It has good drape and stitch definition. I also think that the length of each color in two skeins creates a very nice gradient.

solstand shawl back wrapped

Click here to purchase this pattern in UK and US terms for $4.99
Use code ‘autumn’ to get 20% off your total pattern purchase in my ravelry store from now until Halloween 2019!
Be sure to upload a picture to Ravelry and link it to the pattern! I love seeing everyone’s creations!

Scrappy Stripes Sweater

I’ve completed yet another pattern! This time I used a bunch of my leftover yarn bits and bobs to create a rainbow sweaters I have dubbed the Scrappy Stripes Sweater! This pattern is available as a free downloadable pdf on Ravelry.

Evelyn is sitting down wearing a rainbow crochet sweater

The sweater body is worked from the bottom up, while the sleeves are worked from the top down. Each colored stripe only uses about 80 yards of each scrap, and about 440 yards of a base color, in my case I used cream. This brings the total amount of yarn to about 1720 yards.

If you’ve got sharp eyes, you might notice some yarns that I have used in previous projects! The sweater is primarily made from aran weight yarn, but there are a couple dk and worsted bits snuck in there, with careful consideration as to how that would affect the gauge.

The sweater is made from dc and sc, the cuffs using the back loop only to create texture and stretch, while the sleeves use dc2tog for shape. The stripes keep their clean look using the standing crochet stitch. If you’re unfamiliar with what that is, I’d recommend checking out this tutorial on Moogly.

Scrappy Stripes Sweater Side

Although the weather is a bit warm for this scrappy sweater, I still want to wear it all the time! It was fun to use up the ends of yarn and think about other projects I had made using it.

The pattern is available for free download here. I listed all the yarns I can remember here, but I can’t guarantee the one you’re eyeing is listed. Remember to let me know if you make something using this pattern! You can link it to the project page on Ravelry, or tag me on social media.

Tanabota Top

Evelyn wearing the Tanabota Top, a loose crochet striped top. The top has an open weave and is in blues and teals.

I’ve just released a new pattern for sale on Ravelry! The Tanabota Top comes in sizes XS-XXL, fitting a bust range of 32-49 inches. It uses a size L/8mm crochet hook and worsted weight yarn. It’s the perfect top for summer – it’s sleeveless with an open, light stitch pattern. The patterns is also fairly easy to make, using only half double crochet, chain stitch, and slip stitch.

Tanabota Top Back

The yarn I used is Caron Cotton Cake in Hydrangea. It’s an easy to work with yarn with good stitch definition. However, the 530 yard ball I used had eight knots tying ends together in it. I’ve never come across a yarn with so many knots in it, but the colors are so pretty I didn’t mind too much.

Tanabota Tap Close Up of Hem and Side Seam

The Tanabota Top is worked in one piece from front to back with side seams. Here’s a close up of the join between the front and back along the sides, joined with a whipstitch. I was a bit worried with the color changing properties of the yarn that my stitches might look out of place, but it blended in rather well, I think.

Tanabota Top Front

This pattern is currently available on Ravelry for $2.99. If you’re interested in this pattern, please check it out or click here to buy it now! Be sure to share pictures of what you make, I love to see what everyone comes up with!

Razor’s Hat from World Enough and Time

I was recently asked to make Razor’s Hat from the Doctor Who episode World Enough and Time. I wrote up a pattern just in case anyone else was interested in making one for themself!

What you’ll need:

  • US size 6 needles (4.0 mm)
  • Double knit yarn

I used Stylecraft Special DK in Dark Brown Shade 1004

I found that if you want to make your hat distressed in a similar way to the show, it is easier to prevent unraveling if you create the distressing as you go. I’ve included two versions of the hat, one with distressing and one without.

The hat sits very different just from folding the brim!

Unfamiliar terms explained:

DSPU: drop stitch and pull out stitches all the way to the brim, pick up a stitch on your left needle, ready to be worked as the next stitch

CO 112 stitches in the round

With Distressing

Row 1-17: (K2, P2) 28 times
Row 18: (K2, P2) 2 times, K2, DSPU, P2, (K2, P2) 25 times [112 st]
Row 19-20: (K2, P2) 28 times
Row 21: K112
Row 22-33: (K2, P2) 28 times
Row 34: (K2, P2) 17 times, K2, DSPU, P2 (K2, P2) 10 times [112 st]
Row 35-40: (K2, P2) 28 times
Row 41: (K2, P2) 16 times, K1, DSPU, K1, P2 (K2, P2) 11 times [112 st]
Row 42-47: K112
Row 48: K71, DSPU, K 41 [112 st]
Row 49-51: K112

Without Distressing

Row 1-20: (K2, P2) 28 times
Row 21: K112
Row 22-41: (K2, P2) 28 times
Row 42-51: K112

Both Versions

Row 52-61: P112
Row 62-71: K112
Row 72-81: P112
Row 82-91: K112
Row 92-101: P112
Row 102-111: K112
Row 112-120: P112
Row 121: K2tog [56 st]

After working the last row, pull a piece of yarn through and pull as tight as possible. Weave in your ends and your hat is complete!

13th Doctor Striped Socks

These socks were super fun to make, so I wrote up the pattern and made a video tutorial! Let me know what you think, and be sure to let me know if you make a pair!

Materials:

Special Stylecraft Double Knit in Lapis
Special Stylecraft Double Knit in Duck Egg
3.25 mm Knitting Needles (US3/UK11)

Pattern:

Cast on 60 stitches in Dark Blue
K1P1 all the way around for 8 rows
K all the way around for 8 rows
*Switch to Light Blue, K all the way around for 4 rows
Switch to Dark Blue, K ass the way around for 4 rows
Repeat from * four times, making a total of 5 Dark Blue and 5 Light Blue stripes
Switch to Light Blue, K all the way around for one and a half rows
Shift needles so that you can start the heel from the center back of the work
HEEL & TOE
K 15 stitches, turn
Row 1: sl st, P29, turn
Row 2: sl st, K28, turn
Row 3: sl st, P27, turn
Row 4: sl st, K26, turn
Row 5: sl st, P25, turn
Row 6: sl st, K24, turn
Row 7: sl st, P23, turn
Row 8: sl st, K22, turn
Row 9: sl st, P21, turn
Row 10: sl st, K20, turn
Row 11: sl st, P19, turn
Row 12: sl st, K18, turn
Row 13: sl st, P17, turn
Row 14: sl st, K16, turn
Row 15: sl st, P15, turn
Row 16: sl st, K14, pick up stitch from between previous worked stitch and next stitch on left needle (denoted as m1), k2tog, turn
Row 17: P15, m1, p2tog, turn
Row 18: K16, m1, k2tog, turn
Row 19:  P17, m1, p2tog, turn
Row 20: K18, m1, k2tog, turn
Row 21: P19, m1, p2tog, turn
Row 22: K20, m1, k2tog, turn
Row 23: P21, m1, p2tog, turn
Row 24: K22, m1, k2tog, turn
Row 25: P23, m1, p2tog, turn
Row 26: K24, m1, k2tog, turn
Row 27: P25, m1, p2tog, turn
Row 28: K26, m1, k2tog, turn
Row 29: P27, m1, p2tog, turn
Row 30: K28, m1, k2tog, turn
Row 31: P29, m1, p2tog, turn
HEEL ONLY
Row 32: K 15
Adjust stitches so that you can continue working with your Light Blue yarn where you left off. Complete that row in knit stitch, and then do two more rows of knit stitch in Light Blue.
*Switch to Dark Blue, K all the way around for 4 rows
Switch to Light Blue, P all the way around for 4 rows
Repeat from * until your sock is the right length for your foot.
For reference, I had a total of 5 Dark Blue and 5 Light Blue stripes for my UK size 5 feet.
Refer back to the heel instructions and work the toe the same as the heel.
Complete the sock with kitchener stitch and weave in your ends.

13th Doctor SocksTada! You now have your own pair of 13th Doctor Socks!

Homeward Bound Fingerless Mittens

Homeward Bound MittensWhen I first saw this lovely brown yarn, I knew immediately that I wanted to make some sort of glove or mitten for myself from them. My aunt got the yarn from a place called Pacesetter Alpacas in Beloit, Wisconsin. It’s a wonderfully soft yarn, and I actually got to meet the alpaca from which the wool was collected! I unfortunately lost the label for this yarn, but if I remember correctly, it was a blend of two different kinds of alpacas.Homeward Bound BacksBecause this yarn was so nice, I wanted to pick the perfect pattern. After much searching, I settled on the Homeward Bound Mitts. The cables on the backs of these mittens caught my eye immediately. I hadn’t knit anything with particularly complicated cables before and this looked like a good way to challenge myself.

I made these mittens for myself in size 1 using 3.25 mm/US size 3/UK size 10 DPNs. Because I wasn’t planning on switching needles between the wrist and hand of the glove I chose a size between the two recommended in the pattern. I was a little concerned that they wouldn’t fit properly, but it turned out fine By mistake, I left off the rib on the bottom of the mittens, but I don’t think it’s too noticeable.  Homeward Bound Close UpThe pattern for these mittens was really well written, and included charts for all the cabling sections. I had never made a thumb before, and this pattern described how to knit one well enough that I made almost no mistakes! I love these mittens, and I’m almost tempted to make myself a pair in every color.

Homeward Bound Side and Back

Nardole from Doctor Who

On the second day of London MCM, I wore a cosplay of Nardole from the Doctor Who episode Eaters of Light. I’m starting with the second day because I neglected to get pictures of the costume I wore the first day, but hopefully I’ll get some soon.

I spent the entire day making this same expression

The Nardole costume consisted of a hand knit hat, a sweatshirt, pajama pants, and a kilt. The kilt was simply a huge piece of fabric with serged edges. Unlike how the kilt is worn in the show, I wore mine the same way that one would wear a great kilt.

Nardole full bodySince the sweatshirt was fairly simple in design, I opted to modify a blue zip up sweatshirt I already had instead of making one from scratch. I started by taking out the zipper and the hoodie cord. Then, I added buttonholes and large wooden buttons down the front of the hoodie. Even though I’d taken out the bright white hoodie cord, the eyelets in the hood were still visible in bright silver, so I buttonhole stitched all the way around them.

Phoebe dressed as Bill Potts

The hat I wore is one I’ve already posted about, and have actually written up a pattern for, so be sure to check that out!

This is, by far, one of the most comfortable cosplays I have ever worn. I basically got to walk around in pajamas all day, it was great!

Wilf’s Hat from The End of Time

After knitting two of Nardole’s hats, I felt as though I needed more hats. Why? I don’t know, I can’t possibly find the time to wear them all if I keep making them at this speed! This hat is Wilf’s hat from the Doctor Who episode The End of Time. I remember when I first watched the episode I noticed the hat, but I didn’t think I’d end up making it because it looked so complex.

putting on wilf's hatFast forward to a few months later, and I’ve knitted up the hat! I found a this lovely pattern by Patricia Schönhold on Ravelry. It was my first time knitting from a chart, as well as my first time knitting bobbles. The pattern was easy to understand, and I had no problems with any of it.

wilf's hat sideI knitted this hat up with Stylecraft Special DK in Lipstick (this might be wrong, I’ve lost the label) with size 8 (5.0 mm) knitting needles. I realize I’ve used Stylecraft in most of my recent projects. That’s because Stylecraft is really easy for me to get and it comes in a huge number of colors.wilf's hat topI did end up changing the pattern just a bit. Near the crown of the head, I added two extra twists in the large cables. Because of this, the number of stitches I had on my needles did not match up with the pattern and I ended up decreasing differently. I don’t remember exactly what I did, but the difference is visible.

wilf's hat front

I’m very happy with Wilf’s hat, and I definitely wouldn’t have been able to make it without the pattern I found. I am glad that Patricia Schönhold put this pattern up, and I would recommend it to anyone else looking to make Wilf’s hat.

Nardole’s Hat from The Doctor Falls

nardole hat side 2

That’s right! I made another one of Nardole’s hats! This one is from last week’s Doctor Who episode, The Doctor Falls. It was super simple to make compared to the last one!

front nardole hat
Even though I’m very happy with how my hat turned out, the pattern I’ve put at the bottom of the post is slightly different from the hat pictured here. This is because the one I made is small (it fits my head, but it might not fit yours), and I mistakenly made my hat a bit too short.

What you’ll need:

  • US size 8 needles (5mm)
  • Double knit or worsted weight yarn

I used Stylecraft Special DK in 1035 Burgundy and 1709 Gold.
side of nardole hatCast on 96 st, k1, p1, all the way around for 9 inches, then work the following rows:

It may help to divide your stitches into 6 equal sections of 16 stitches

Row 1: *p2tog, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k2tog tbl, repeat from * (total of 84 stitches)

Row 2: p1, k1, all the way around

Row 3: *k2tog, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p2tog tbl, repeat from * (total of 72 stitches)

Row 4: k1, p1, all the way around

Row 5: *p2tog, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k2tog tbl, repeat from * (total of 60 stitches)

Row 6: p1, k1, all the way around

Row 7: *k2tog, p1, k1, p1, k1, p1, k1, p2tog tbl, repeat from * (total of 48 stitches)

Row 8: k1, p1, all the way around

Row 9: *p2tog, k1, p1, k1, p1, k2tog tbl, repeat from * (total of 36 stitches)

Row 10: p1, k1, all the way around

Row 11: *k2tog, p1, k1, p2tog tbl, repeat from * (total of 24 stitches)

Row 12: k1, p1, all the way around

Pull the yarn tail through remaining stitches, pull tight, and secure ends.

All that’s left is to add your pom pom on top and you’re done!

Nardole’s Hat from The Eaters of Light

This is my version of the hat that Nardole wears in the Doctor Who episode The Eaters of Light. When this episode aired last week, I immediately knew that I needed to make his hat. It was fairly simple to make, and I’ll share my process so that anyone who wants one can make one too.

nardole's hat pulled over face

This is how you wear a hat, right?

What you’ll need:

  • US size 8 needles (5mm)
  • Double knit or worsted weight yarn
  • Special Stylecraft DK in Lemon Shade 1020
  • Special Stylecraft DK in Dark Brown Shade 1004
  • Special Stylecraft DK in Green 1116
  • Special Stylecraft DK in Camel 1420
  • Special Stylecraft DK in Spice 1711

Cast on 70 stitches in the round in dark brown (must be a multiple of 10)

Rows 1-13: k1, p1 all the way around

Row 14: fold the brim to the inside of the hat attach to previous row with k1, p1

From here on, the every row is purled. (The design is worked on top after completion)

1 row in lemon, 7 rows in spice,
1 row in green, 7 rows in camel,
1 row in lemon, 7 rows in dark brown,
1 row in spice, 7 rows in lemon,
1 row in camel, 7 rows in green,
1 row in dark brown, 7 rows in lemon,
1 row in spice, 7 rows in dark brown.

On the last row, pull a piece of yarn through all of the stitches. Do not gather it yet, it is easier to work in the design beforehand.

inside of nardole's hat

Interior of the unfinished hat

The design on top is made by weaving pieces of yarn that are the same color as the single rows. They are woven around the knit stitch below this row and brought up to the stripe above at varying heights. This is difficult for me to explain, but I hope the pictures are good enough to understand what I mean. After making the design, tighten the yarn you previously pulled through the top row of stitches and secure. Make a large pom pom out of the dark brown yarn and attach it to the top.

If anyone does make this hat, be sure to let me know!

side of nardole's hat ii

Since it’s summer, I doubt I’ll be wearing the hat any time soon. As soon as cold weather hits, though, I’ll be wearing it all the time!